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The War of the Infinite.
An Essay by Glennray Tutor.
Glennray Tutor (yes, my father) recently gave a speech on the meaning of his work - particularly his “Jar” and “Bottle” series but he also worked his entire body of work into the speech.  I found the speech to be enlightening and it made me proud of my father, not only as a son but as an artist.  You can read it in full below:

Today I’m showing images of paintings from my “Jar” and “Bottle” series. But everything that I say applies to all my paintings: my “Firework” series, my “Heart Shaped Box” series, my “Comic Book” series, etc.

First, I’ll talk about technique.
My paintings are made by applying oil paint onto canvas or paper, using brushes. Basically, I’m using the same technique as did such artists as Vermeer or Caravaggio. However, I photograph my objects. Then, I use the photographs for reference instead of the actual objects. There is more visual information contained in the photos than in what a human eye can see alone. So I have more detail to draw from, as I choose. This is the starting point for the physical painting process. As the painting progresses I may eliminate objects that appeared in the original photo composition, or enhance them, rearrange them, add a new object, or objects, change colors, change scale. All elements are open for manipulation or modification, as I feel appropriate for the painting. Eventually in the process, the photos are put aside, and all references then occur within the painting and myself.
I am described as a Photorealist, and considered part of the art movement known as Photorealism, which began around 1970. In helping to distinguish a Photorealist painting, in addition to photography being used as one of the tools in the artist’s creative process, Photorealist paintings on first viewing appear not to be paintings, but, instead, photographs. This is because with a Photorealist painting, the viewer must get very close before detecting those elements normally associated with oil paintings: Brushstrokes, texture, etc. Sometimes, as with my paintings, a magnifying glass is required to be sure it is actually an oil painting.
Why do I choose to paint this way?
Because I believe that visual evidence of how the painting was achieved interferes with a viewer’s perception/experience of the art in the painting.
To help clarify, here are two analogies: When watching a magician’s performance, I don’t want to know how he does the trick, because my sense of wonder will be lessened. When hearing a musical performance, I don’t want to hear all the wrong notes, chords and rhythms that were tried during the process that led to the final piece. I want to experience the flawless end product.
I should emphasize here that flawless technique alone will never generate a work of art. A perfectly played sonata, for example, without an engaging melody, will fail. I try to choose my objects and orchestrate them in my painting compositions, so that the viewer is engaged and entertained… by an interplay of the visual, emotional and intellectual. Metaphor is a very important component in my paintings.

Now … I’ll discuss what I’m attempting to achieve with my work. My paintings are my war against the infinite.
From what we know of the universe, it goes cosmically out, and keeps going. There is no end to it. It is infinite. It also goes in, quantumly (I’m speaking about atoms and what they consist of), and keeps going. It appears there is no end as to how far it goes. It, too, is infinite. So there are two infinities: the cosmic one, and the quantum one.
This idea of the infinite is a difficult one for me. It’s very hard for me to conceive of such a thing. It’s almost as hard for me to conceive of infinity as it is for me to conceive of our reality: Matter. The universe itself. The stars, galaxies, this planet, life forms, the myriad facets of this existence, you and me, our amazing sentience.
And, of course, the Thing — The Big Thing — that all of it moves in: Time.
Actually, it’s easier for me to conceive of nothing than it is for me to conceive of something. But, in spite of my abilities of conception — or lack thereof — here we are. And there is matter. And there is reality. There is time. And it all appears to be infinite.
Consequently, in my paintings, I try to alleviate the personally troubling aspects of infinity, both the cosmic and the quantum, by depicting an idea of containment, the complete opposite of infinite. I want to depict a place where both infinities have been reeled in. Where there is just now. Where time is a single moment, contained.

"A Season of Moment" by Glennray Tutor.
These jars are you and I with our magnificent essence contained. The sealed vessels provide comfort, safety, beauty, and nothing is moving, nothing is changing. You seem to be in a Season of Moment. And for a while this seems real. However, eventually, the viewer will realize that this is not the truth. Now, and I hate to disclose this part, but what is also happening with my work is just the opposite of what I have described. In my painting the colors, shapes, lines, their particles of emotion, of the intellectual, all elements are turning into light. And are all coming away from my painting.
My arrangement of matter, which is what my painting actually is, is coming away like a tidal wave washing onto us and through us like radioactivity through us and onward and onward and outward and inward and on and on forever. And, be aware: be cautious as you look into the world I’ve created hanging on the wall. You might fall into it and never stop falling. But, let’s pause here, and let’s go back to that moment I spoke of earlier.
With the way I have arranged my painted construction it is just like opening a door and stepping inside a room. You enter and you are in a place where you are immortal. You have the time to explore and see and contemplate any beauty, any profundity.
At least until the jars are opened.
And it’s okay. Because then we go to Heaven.

The War of the Infinite.

An Essay by Glennray Tutor.

Glennray Tutor (yes, my father) recently gave a speech on the meaning of his work - particularly his “Jar” and “Bottle” series but he also worked his entire body of work into the speech.  I found the speech to be enlightening and it made me proud of my father, not only as a son but as an artist.  You can read it in full below:

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Book Picks: October
I’ve chosen five of my favorite books of recent memory, some art and some not, to talk about and bring attention to for October.

Steal Like An Artist by Austin Kleon — Kleon’s straight to the point, honest guide for artists is basically that.  A no nonsense and short handbook that will help aspiring artists and inspire artists.
American Prospects by Joel Sternfeld — The photography of Sternfeld deals with the American landscape in a haunting, almost foreign light and this haunting sense of place creates immense emotion with the photographs.

Joel Sternfeld.
Defining Contemporary Art — The past 25 years in the art world are confusing, strange ones and this book wholeheartedly attempts to define them through a linear collection of 200 pieces of art.  Each year of the 25 years has an essay discussing it but the overall history is left to the reader to define.  I personally enjoyed it because of the artist profiles and the over 700 color plates.
The Yellow Birds by Kevin Powers — Not an art book but almost.  Powers’s melodic prose is the most artistically written book I’ve read since first picking up Cormac McCarthy’s The Road.
Painting, Musee d’Orsay — Presents 300 works of art from Musee d’Orsay in chronological (1848 - 1914) and thematic order. Features some of the best reproductions of artwork I’ve ever come across in a book.  

Book Picks: October

I’ve chosen five of my favorite books of recent memory, some art and some not, to talk about and bring attention to for October.

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Casey Neistat.

The YouTube Films of Casey Neistat.

I first came across Casey Neistat’s video work perhaps a year ago when I watched “Bike Lanes by Casey Neistat" on YouTube, his anger driven video on New York City’s bike lane laws inspired by receiving a ticket for riding his bike outside the lane.  His way of dealing with the issue was creative, humorous and hooked my attention, so I watched a few others.  I said to myself, "this guy is really good at this."

After my video watching binge the videos and name settled in the back of my mind and I went on with my art posting and Tumblr antics.  Until a few months later when I came across the video above: “Make It Count.”  According to the video Nike asked Neistat to make a short film about how to “make it count” and in turn Neistat took all of the money Nike gave him and flew around the world for ten days, “making it count.”  The video is fantastic and is a perfect commercial for the product Nike is selling.  It’s also beautifully shot and edited and the narrative really hits home.  It was at this point I said to myself, “who is this guy?”

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